Advertising Sex The New Crime

Advertising Sex The New Crime

The Feds say a ban on advertising sex services will combat trafficking and protect underage victims, but prohibition may actually have the opposite effect.

“Skilled Lips & Tight Grips –

I’m sweet as heaven. Bad as hell.”

“Sexy, exotic, petite, Italian treat –

Unrushed outcall specials.”

“Come Spend Time With a True Goddess.”

“Two Beauties You Can’t Go Wrong With. Your Search Stops Here.”

This is just a sample of thousands of escort classified ads on websites, Facebook, Twitter and pretty much anywhere online or in print. And as of December 6, they are history in Canada now that Bill C-36, the new federal anti-prostitution legislation, has become law

According to Justice Minister Peter Mackay, it will affect “all forms of advertising (of sexual services), including online. Anything that enables or furthers what we think is an inherently dangerous practice of prostitution will be subject to prosecution.”

advertising sex

The new law ranks among the harshest in the world. Advertising sexual services is legal, or at least tolerated, in Europe and elsewhere in North America. In the UK, for example, the “tart cards” that once plastered the ubiquitous red phone boxes have moved online. The internet and social networks are now prime hubs for sex-related ads.

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