Sex workers fear new Canadian prostitution laws will compromise safety

Feb 7, 2014
Legal
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Advocates oppose federal government’s interest in the ‘Nordic model

Advocate Valerie Scott fears that Canadian sex workers won't have adequate protection under rewritten federal laws. (Frank Gunn/Canadian Press)

Advocate Valerie Scott fears that Canadian sex workers won’t have adequate protection under rewritten federal laws. (Frank Gunn/Canadian Press)

Safety

When the Supreme Court of Canada declared three major prostitution laws unconstitutional in December, Valerie Scott called it the best day of her life. Now, Scott and other advocates for safer conditions for sex workers are concerned the ruling may have been futile.

Scott is one of the three sex workers who challenged the prostitution laws in Bedford v. Canada. The court struck down laws prohibiting brothels, living off the avails of prostitution, and communicating in public with clients because it said they force sex workers into dangerous situations.

But the court’s decision has become a hollow victory for Scott and her colleagues. Parliament has been given 12 months to rewrite the laws, and has expressed interest in legislation many sex workers say would do nothing to improve their working conditions and could even make them worse.

Justice Minister Peter MacKay told CBC in January the government intends to draft legislation that would help sex workers transition out of the industry, and instead punish pimps and johns. This is what’s known as the Nordic model of prostitution, and in essence it makes it legal to sell sex but not to buy it.

The Nordic model is already enforced in three European countries: Sweden, Norway and Iceland. French MPs have approved a bill that will penalize those paying for sex, but the bill must still pass the Senate before it comes into play.

Brenda Cossman, a law professor at University of Toronto, said it has created many of the same problems sex workers in Canada want to avoid.

“Those on the streets are working in very, very risky conditions because they go further into remote areas,” Cossman said, describing the situation in Europe. “They have to do the negotiation very quickly. It doesn’t give them any time to assess risk.”

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Sex workers fear new Canadian prostitution laws will compromise safety | The Rob Black Website
6 years ago

[…] Sex workers fear new Canadian prostitution laws will compromise safety […]

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Sex workers fear new Canadian prostitution laws will compromise safety | AdultWikiMedia
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[…] Sex workers fear new Canadian prostitution laws will compromise safety […]

Ernest Greene
Ernest Greene
6 years ago

They’re right to be afraid. Whenever men (and most governing bodies consist overwhelmingly of men) sit down to write laws governing women’s “proper conduct” the outcomes are predictably bad.

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